Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Pulp Appeal: Penny Dreadful

Posted: August 12, 2019 in Uncategorized

Broadswords and Blasters

Penny Dreadful main cast advertising image. From left to right, Josh Hartnett, Billie Piper, Harry Treadaway, Eva Green, Reeve Carney, Timothy Dalton, Danny Sapani

Cover ad for an original penny dreadful from the late 1800s for "Spring Heeled Jack."

Penny dreadfuls of the late 19th Century were the direct ancestors of pulp fiction rags of the early 20th Century. The name is definitely British in origin, and the publications themselves were most popular in Victorian England, though they were sometimes brought in to America by travelers. The closest neighbor native to the US were the dime novels, though as the name suggests they cost a dime rather than a penny and were often full novels in length, whereas the penny dreadfuls were more like comic books in length, each one roughly a chapter of a larger piece, costing one British penny each. Like the dime novels and later pulps, penny dreadfuls were printed on the cheapest of the cheap wood pulp material. Sadly that means they don’t hold up much over time, and the ones that still exist need to be handled relatively carefully.

Eva Green as Vanessa Ives

Penny Dreadful is the Showtime/Sky…

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Pulp Appeal: Storyhack #3

Posted: August 5, 2019 in Uncategorized

Broadswords and Blasters

Design wise, Storyhack continues to set a high bar. Full illustrations grace every story, with additional small cartoons interspersed within the stories. The full-sized layout of the magazine is a good choice, as is the double columns, leaving room for the designer to call out specific passages. I’m perfectly willing to admit that I wish the crime-based stories had a bit more edge to them, but then I’ve been spoiled by the likes of SWITCHBLADE and PULP MODERN. There is definitely more than enough here for a reader to sink their teeth into, and yeah, you might get a bit of pulp stuck between your teeth.

Claws of the Puma by Paul R. McNamee – A jungle
adventure where an American journalist is investigating the struggle of local
rubber famers against ruthless loggers in Brazil. The wild card in this case is
the Puma, local wilderness hero. The Puma…

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(Editor’s Note: Anthony Perconti lives and works in the hinterlands of New Jersey with his wife and kids. He enjoys well-crafted and engaging stories across a variety of genres and mediums.  His articles have appeared in several online venues and can be found on Twitter at @AnthonyPerconti.  If you’d like to submit an article, send us a pitch. Payment is one digital copy of your choice of any issue of Broadswords and Blasters. )

Blood Standard is Laird Barron’s first official
foray into the hardboiled crime fiction genre. I first encountered the author’s
works several years ago, when I picked up an e-book copy of his Imago Sequence and Other Stories. Soon
after, I polished off a longer work, The
Croning
, followed up by some of his novellas. Up to this point in his
career, Barron’s preferred medium of expression has been within the confines of
the…

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Issue 10 is Live!

Posted: July 16, 2019 in Uncategorized

Broadswords and Blasters

Alive. Alive. ALIVE! Issue 10 is ALIVE!

(Well, Kindle anyway. Print version should be up later this week.)

One of the biggest problems with taking submissions for multiple issues all at once is simply forgetting how awesome the stories we accept truly are. While the long term burden is lessened because of a robust and productive submissions period, we read so many stories in such a short time, that by the time an issue is being prepped six months down the road we have to refresh ourselves on what exactly we are publishing. The upside is that we fall in love with the stories all over again. We are truly blessed to have so many great submissions from so many talented writers, and this issue is packed full of them, including one returning author, and the rest of whom are gracing our pages for the first time, though you’ve likely…

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(Editor’s Note: R.A. Goliis an Australian writer of horror, fantasy, and speculative short stories. In addition to writing, her interests include reading, gaming, the occasional walk, and annoying her dog, two cats, and husband.Check out her numerous publications including her fantasy novella,The Eighth Dwarf, and her collection of short stories,Unfetteredathttps://ragoliauthor.wordpress.com/or stalk her on facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/RAGoliAuthor/. Her stories have appeared in issues 1 and 9 of Broadsword and Blasters).

Image result for the beastmaster

The Beastmaster is a classic sword and sorcery tale, loosely based on the novel of the same name by Andre Norton, released in 1959. The movie, released in 1982, stars Marc Singer as Dar (Dallas, 1986), Tanya Roberts as Kiri (Charlies Angels, 1981), Rip Torn as Maax (30 Rock, 2007-2009), and John Amos as Seth (Good Times, 1974-1976).

The movie begins with three dark-robed priests
entering a temple where a trio of…

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Broadswords and Blasters

Editors’ Note: Joshua Grasso is a professor of English at a small university in Oklahoma, where he teaches courses in British and World literature (the older, the better), as well as comics and popular literature. He has several indie novels available on-line and has recently published stories in Aphelion Magazine and the Exterus anthology, Magissa. He can be found on Facebook at facebook.com/grassonovels or his Amazon author page:amazon.com/Joshua-Grasso If you’d like to submit an article, send us a pitch. Payment is one digital copy of your choice of any issue ofBroadswords and Blasters.

Clark Ashton Smith is a name that exists at the periphery of science fiction and fantasy lore, a name often evoked but rarely read. He is sometimes dismissed as an imitator of Lovecraft, at other times, as a writer whose exotic, hot-house prose often overshadowed his stories. Yet the titles of his numerous…

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I’m not just covering Pulp Modern’s latest issue because Matt has a story in it. Honest. In fact, although Matt and I have been friends long enough that we started this publication together, he’s not even the reason I picked up this issue. Nope, I picked it up because I wanted to read more Adam S. Furman, Rex Weiner, and C.W. Blackwell, all of whom have graced our own pages. I’m a touch jealous, but damn if these stories don’t deserve to be read. And not just those three, but all of them.

The issue starts off with editor Alec Cizak’s foreword. Other reviews have highlighted his discussion on imagination and done so better than I would, so I’ll just leave it to them. I did want to highlight his discussion on world psychology and how we in 2019 are entering the same headspace as people a hundred years ago…

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Pulp Appeal: Switchblade #9

Posted: June 10, 2019 in Uncategorized

Broadswords and Blasters

We’ve covered Switchblade before, and editor Matthew X. Gomez even had a flash piece published in Issue Seven, but that’s not going to stop us from covering their latest, Issue 9.

We start with a poem by Willie Smith taking us down to New Orleans in Voodoo Spider which crosses that line between noir and horror with the reader guessing which side of the line it’s on.

“Lucky Fuck” by Jack Bates follows a twisting, small town tale of car accidents, revenge, bitter recriminations and regrets. You’ll be left wondering if the main character is actually lucky, or just unlucky enough to keep from dying.

“Death Letter Blues” by Mark Slade could have used another round of editing, in this editor’s humble opinion, but is a twisted little tale of a man who lives in a reality adjacent to, but not fully in synchronicity with, this world. It’s self-delusion…

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Editors’ Note: Anthony Perconti lives and works in the hinterlands of New Jersey with his wife and kids. He enjoys good stories across many different genres and mediums. His articles have appeared inSwords and Sorcery MagazineandDMR Books Blog.

Cover of Chester Himes novel A Rage in Harlem

Chester Himes, an African American expat living in France, published his first crime novel in the United States in 1957 under the title of For the Love of Imabelle. This book was eventually re-named to its current moniker, A Rage in Harlem. This is the first book in what came to be known as Himes’ Harlem Cycle (alternately known as the Harlem Detectives series), that was awarded the French Grand Prix de la Litterature Policiere. The main protagonist of the book is Jackson, who resides in Harlem with Imabelle, the love of his life who he plans on marrying. He has a steady job at the local…

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Broadswords and Blasters

So we’ve talked about John
Wick
before, but with Chapter 3: Parabellum having just been released, we
figured it would be a good idea to revisit the franchise. Some spoilers will
follow.

For anyone that doesn’t know- John Wick, prior to the events of the first movie, was a retired assassin, the one you sent to kill other assassins in fact. Over the course of the films, he is brought back into the underworld of crime, only to find himself on the wrong side of well, just about everyone. The third movie picks up exactly with where the second one left off, with John tired and wounded, with an hour to go before an open bounty of fourteen million dollars is called. What with being in New York, people are coming out of the woodwork to collect.

Image result for john wick chapter 3
Yes, Keanu Reeves rides a horse in this installment. Yes, it is glorious.

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